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Rider Waite Tarot Deck Backs

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Evidence of Popularity The Rider Waite Tarot is so famous that it has served as the inspiration for a large number (if not the majority) of other tarot decks. Some decks follow the Marseilles Tarot's arrangement, while others develop their own systems altogether. However, the majority of tarot decks are based on the RWS Tarot, in terms of card numbers, symbolism, and meaning. Variations on the Rider-Waite Tarot: Clones and Daughters The Rider Waite Tarot is so famous that it has served as the inspiration for a large number (if not the majority) of subsequent tarot decks. While there are still a few tarot cards that follow the Marseilles decks' ordering or design their own, the majority of tarot decks are based on the RWS Tarot.

This deck is most well-known in the English-speaking world, since it was the first deck drawn by Pamela Coleman Smith for esoteric purposes. The Rider Waite Smith tarot decks have drawn minor arcana that are brimming with occult and divinatory implications. It was initially published in 1909 with A.E. Waite's book âThe Pictorial Key to the Tarot,â which included the interpretations with which many of us are acquainted today. While both A.E. Waite and Pamela Coleman Smith were members of the Golden Dawn, a metaphysical society whose philosophy included tarot within a larger framework of esoteric concepts, the Rider Waite Smith deck was purposefully drawn to avoid overt astrological and kabbalistic associations, as it was intended for mass market distribution. Rather than that, the iconography was derived from visions received by Smith (Lon Milo DuQuette, âUnderstanding Aleister Crowley's Thoth Tarotâ).

Smith moved to England and worked as a theatrical designer for tiny theatre as well as an artist, mostly of books, pamphlets, and posters. She joined the Order of the Golden Dawn in 1903. In 1909, she began a series of seventy-eight allegorical paintings, which Waite referred to as a corrected tarot pack. The designs, which were published concurrently by William Rider and Son, reflect the artist's mysticism, ritual, imagination, fantasy, and profound emotions. Waite, Arthur Edward

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