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Tootie Smith Meet Me In St Louis

MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS, based on the uplifting MGM film, is a rare gem of musical theatre; a wholesome and pleasant depiction of a turn-of-the-century American family. Summer 1903, and the Smith family is looking forward to the inauguration of the 1904 World's Fair. Over the course of a year, the family's mutual respect, tempered with good humor, aids them in navigating romance, opportunity, and tragedy. Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane composed the music and lyrics.

Martin subsequently said, âThe original version was so solemn that Judy Garland declined to perform it. âIf I sing that, little Margaret will weep, and people will believe I am a monster,â she said. Thus, I was young and rather arrogant at the time, and I answered, âWell, I'm sorry you don't like it, Judy, but that's the way it is, and I'm not in the mood to compose a new lyric.â However, Tom Drake, who portrayed the youngster next door [Truett], approached me and told me, âHugh, you have to complete it. It has the potential to be a very fantastic song, and I believe you will regret not attempting it.â As a result, I returned home and composed the version that appears in the film.â [8] Apart from Drake's involvement with Martin, Garland had also approached Minnelli personally to have the lyrics rewritten. The final version injects a ray of optimism into a song that is unfortunately still extremely depressing.

THE FANTASY STUFFI'm always surprised at how few musical numbers there are in Meet Me in St Louis. It's always as though the music is playing non-stop! One listen to the 1989 Broadway adaptation's music, which includes at least eight more songs by the same composers (and in which we discover Tootie's name is Sarah), and you're likely to get a new respect for the virtues of brevity. I'm constantly surprised at how few musical numbers there are in. It's always as though the music is playing non-stop! One listen to the 1989 Broadway adaptation's music, which includes at least eight more songs by the same composers (and in which we discover Tootie's name is Sarah), and you're likely to get a new respect for the virtues of brevity.

After Tootie disrupts Lon's farewell party, Esther invites her to perform 'Did You Ever See a Rabbit Climb a Tree?' for the group. This is a nonsensical poem written by L. Frank Baum, the creator of The Wizard of Oz (from 1899's Father Goose: His Book). This picture was a box-office triumph, earning more than any other MGM production in the preceding two decades — excepting David O. Selznick's Gone with the Wind (1939).

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